Can You Freeze Sour Cream?

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can you freeze sour cream

If you’re suddenly left with excess sour cream but no immediate use for it, you may be wondering just what to do with it.

The simple answer is to freeze sour cream. Here’s how.

Can you freeze sour cream? Yes, you can freeze sour cream. As grocery prices rise and we become more aware of just how much food is wasted, we tend to look for ways to be better consumers. If you’re tired of throwing away food, and by extension, money, it’s time to find a solution. Many foods, including sour cream, can be frozen and used later when you have a use for them.

In this article, we’ll explain how to freeze sour cream and what important considerations should be made.

Important things to know before freezing sour cream

freezing sour cream

Before you go ahead and freeze your extra sour cream, there are a few things to be aware of.

Sour cream can be frozen, but unlike some foods, it’s not quite a simple process.

Taste after freezing

Thankfully, after you freeze and then thaw sour cream, it will taste the same.

This is why freezing sour cream is such a great way to prevent food waste.

Texture after freezing

Unfortunately, the texture of frozen sour cream will change drastically after it is thawed.

Sour cream will separate once thawed and will take on the consistency of cottage cheese.

It might not be pleasant to look at, but you can still use frozen sour cream in recipes such as baked goods and casseroles.

If your thawed sour cream is too runny, you can add a bit of cornstarch to thicken it up.

Also, whip it really well once its thawed to create as thick a consistency as possible.

**How about other condiments and sauces? Find out if you can freeze hummus in this guide here!!!**

Steps to Freeze Sour Cream

  • First, a little preparation is needed. To get the best possible consistency, whip your sour cream with a whisk so that the liquid is evenly distributed.
  • You can either keep the sour cream in its original container or transfer it to a freezer-safe container.
  • If there isn’t much sour cream left in the original container, transfer it to a different container. Too much air space can affect the quality of your sour cream.
  • If you are using a freezer bag, squeeze as much air out of the container as possible.
  • Write the date on your container of sour cream.
  • Put the container into the freezer. Place it in the back and not on the freezer door so that it will last longer.
  • Sour cream can be frozen up to 6 months.

How to Use Frozen Sour Cream

how to freeze sour cream

The best way to use frozen sour cream is in recipes that require baking.

There are plenty of muffin and cake recipes that use sour cream.

Use can also create savory dishes, such as casseroles and perogies.

It is not wise to use frozen sour cream where the texture of a recipe should be smooth.

This includes cheesecakes and parfaits. While the taste may be fine, we eat with our eyes first and there are some recipes that can be ruined by the crumbly texture of once frozen sour cream.

The biggest takeaway from freezing sour cream is that it shouldn’t be used on its own.

Whether it’s as a topping for a baked potato or an add-on to enchiladas, the texture of frozen sour cream will prevent you from using it on its own.

How to Thaw Frozen Sour Cream

The best way to thaw frozen sour cream is to place it in the refrigerator overnight.

If you place frozen sour cream on the countertop it will thaw faster but you can expose it to a temperature that promotes the growth of bacteria.

Leaving frozen sour cream in the refrigerator overnight allows it to thaw at a slow but steady rate.

It will also stay at the right temperature so it will remain safe to be used.

If you really need to thaw frozen sour cream quickly, you can use the microwave.

Turn the microwave on for 30-second intervals. This allows the sour cream to slowly thaw and preserves the texture a bit.

Don’t overcook sour cream in the microwave. The results will be a runny mess that won’t look good and probably won’t taste good, either.

Related Questions

Does freezing sour cream ruin it?

Freezing sour cream does not ruin its taste. It does, however, alter its texture.

While you might not want to use frozen sour cream as a topping for your baked potato, it can be used in baking or other recipes such as casseroles.

The texture of frozen sour cream will change drastically as the liquid separates.

However, frozen sour cream is perfect for any recipes that require further baking.

How long can you keep sour cream in the freezer?

You can keep sour cream in the freezer for up to 6 months. Just be sure to store it properly so that it doesn’t develop freezer burn.

Always label and date your freezer contents and try to rotate them so you know what is in your freezer.

The more organized you are, the less food waste there will be.

What can I do with extra sour cream?

If you have extra sour cream, the best thing to do is freeze it. This allows you to use it at a later date and saves you money in the long term.

While you can freeze sour cream in its original package, it’s best to transfer it to a freezer-safe container so it will last longer and not succumb to freezer burn.

An alternative is to find a recipe, such as a cake, that requires sour cream and use up any extra in a productive manner.

Can you microwave frozen sour cream?

If you have frozen sour cream but want to be able to thaw it quickly, you can use a microwave.

However, don’t just place it in the microwave for a few minutes.

Instead, heat the sour cream in the microwave for 30-second intervals. This allows it to thaw without becoming too hot and runny.

Related Reading: Can you freeze guacamole? Learn to extend its shelf-life here!

Conclusion

You can definitely freeze sour cream.

While the texture will change slightly, you can use thawed sour cream in numerous baked dishes, allowing you to save time and money in the process.

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