15 Popular Types of Grapes – Complete Guide 2020

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types of grapes

At one point in our lives, we’ve eaten grapes. And we’ve also enjoyed jam, jellies, juice, and most likely wine. Grapes are a delicious, multi-faceted fruit. They can be snacked on by themselves and transformed into even more delicious eats.

How many different types of grapes are there?

There are over 10,000 types of grapes and they are grown all over the world. Grapes can be a bit sensitive when growing, and the climate and soil conditions will determine which variety can be grown and where.

While there are indigenous grapes, there are also hybrid and modified grapes, as scientists have continually tried to create new and exciting tastes.

What are the different types of grapes?  

RED GRAPES

Crimson Seedless

Crimson Seedless

While you probably just refer to this variety as red grapes when at the grocery store, they are scientifically called Crimson Seedless. Crafted in the late 1980s, this is a hardy grape perfect for munching on.

They have a thicker skin that keeps them fresh for longer and a nice balance between sweetness and tartness.

  • Growing season: August to November
  • Growing area: California

Pinot Noir Grape

Pinot Noir Grape

Who doesn’t love a good glass of pinot noir wine? While these grapes are mainly used in the production of red wine, there are some who enjoy them fresh from the vineyard.

Pinot noir grapes are deep purple in color and can be found both in France and around parts of Canada and the United States.

The grapes are quite thin-skinned, making them a bit more delicate. They are also rich in flavor levels, and you may be able to detect hints of strawberry, caramel, and cherry.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: France, New Zealand, Oregon, California, and British Columbia

Moon Drops

Moon Drops

Moon Drop grapes are an incredibly interesting variety and also incredibly new. In fact, they have only become available in the last year.

The path to creating this variety of grapes started 15 years ago when Dr. David Cain began experimenting with different types of grapes. Instead of using a faster, GMO method, he instead used basic breeding practices, which was why it took so long for these grapes to manifest.

The result is a grape that is cylinder in shape. They have a deep purple skin and a semi-sweet taste to them.

You can keep these grapes in the fridge for up to a week and their skin will remain solid and a bit crunchy.

  • Growing season: July to September
  • Growing area: Central California

Valiant Grape

valiant grape

We have to assume that the name of these grapes came from their personality. Instead of warm, arid regions that most grapes thrive in, Valiant grapes actually grow in Alaska.

Almost blue in color, Valiant grapes are large in size and perfect for making jams and juice. Their flesh is high in sugar, making this a very sweet variety of grape.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: Alaska and Northern Canada

Concord

Concord grape

Concord grapes are a nice, vintage variety that is now extremely common. They were named after the town they started in, Concord Massachusetts.

In 1989, concord grapes really took off, in large part to dentist Thomas Welch. Yes, that name should sounds familiar as he went on to create Welch’s Grape Juice. To this day, the company still uses 100% grape juice.

Concord grapes have a very sweet flavor, which is why they are so good in juice, as well as jams. The grapes are also easy to peel if you want to enjoy them fresh, and their large seeds make them easier to eat.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: Washington State, Northern New York, and Great Lakes area

Lemberger

Lemberger grape

While this dark grape originated in Germany, it has since found success growing in the wine regions of New York and British Columbia.

Wines produced from Lemberger grapes are rich in color with slightly spicy notes. Unlike other red grapes, both the skin and the inside flesh are a rich purple color.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: Germany, Austria, New York, and British Columbia

Champagne Grape

Champagne Grape

Unfortunately, we’re not talking about the grapes that make up that delicious champagne everyone wants to have on New Year’s Eve. These grapes are actually quite different.

Champagne grapes are very tiny, often no larger than a pea. They have a nice, sweet taste that allows them to act as a garnish or a fun snack to munch on.

Despite their tiny size, Champagne grapes have a thick skin which leads to a nice crunch when you bite into them.

  • Growing season: June to September
  • Growing area:  France, Mediterranean area, and California

Kyoho Grape

Kyoho Grape

Most grapes will grow in the same types of regions, but Kyoho grapes are the rare outlier. They only grow in Japan.

Produced in the 1930s, the meaning of Kyoho translates to “giant mountain grape.” Kyoho grapes can grow to be quite large, even reaching the size of a plum, hence the interesting name.

Their purple black coloring is quite vivid and the skin is easy to peel. For taste, expect a bright burst of sweetness.

Kyoho grapes are often served as dessert or even mixed into cocktails. Just be warned that you will have to peel the thick skin as it is inedible.

  • Growing season: July to August
  • Growing area: Japan

Sweet Jubilee

Sweet Jubilee

Relatively new, Sweet Jubilee grapes weren’t introduced until 2012. After much experimenting, the result was a grape so large you could easily mistake it for a plum.

Sweet Jubilee grapes are quite versatile. You can snack on them whole, slice them for a garnish, or spread a bit of peanut butter on them for a kid-friendly treat.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: California

Green grapes

Riesling

Riesling

There’s a reason Riesling grapes are so great for white wine. They can craft sweet wines, dessert wines, and dry wines, making them quite versatile.

Pale green in color, Riesling grapes prefer cooler climates and can be used in both wine and juice.

Interestingly, Riesling grapes really pick up the flavors of the soil they’re grown in. All the minerals lurking below the surface of the ground can affect the taste of the grapes and in turn, the wine they’re used for.

  • Growing season: August to October
  • Growing area: Germany, Austria, New York, and Canada  

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc Grape

Like most wine grapes, this variety gets its name by the type of wine it produces. Sauvignon Blanc grapes are indigenous to France and have a subtle green color to their skins.

Their French roots are reflected in their name, which translates to savage and white. While their inner flesh is still a white color, the grapes are no longer wild and savage, and instead are cultivated to produce quality wines.

For taste, expect a crisp texture that borders between sweet and sour.

  • Growing season: July to September  
  • Growing area: France, Australia, Canada, and California

Gewürztraminer

Gewürztraminer

These grapes have a sweet taste which translates to the wine they are made out of. Gewürztraminer grapes are small in size, with a pale blush coloring to them.

However, when you bite into one, don’t expect that traditional grape taste. Instead, you will find a crisp taste that is almost reminiscent of a peach or apricot.

They are excellent for producing sweet, refreshing white wine.

  • Growing season: July to September
  • Growing area: Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, and South Africa

Sultana

Sultana

Also going by the name of Thomson Seedless grapes, Sultana grapes have been around for a while. In fact, they were a mainstay during the Ottoman Empire.

Today, Sultana grapes are the go-to when it comes to making raisins. Chefs also like playing around with this variety, making unique dishes from them, including pairing them with seafood and different herbs.

They are smaller in size, although still have that quintessential pale green coloring.

  • Growing season: July to September
  • Growing area: California, Australia, and Turkey

Moon Balls

Moon Balls

New to the grape scene, Moon Balls are so far only grown in South Africa. They are large and green in color, with white seeds in the middle.

Moon Balls have quite thick skin, wrapped around a fleshy middle that is fairly sweet.

Unfortunately, Moon Balls were created by the mega company Dole, and while they seem to have big plans in the future for these grapes, production is still quite limited.

  • Growing season: February to March
  • Growing area: South Africa

Cotton Candy

Cotton Candy

Over the last few years, Cotton Candy grapes have become quite the phenomenon. Essentially, when you bite into them, they really do taste like cotton candy.

They are green and slightly oval in shape. Their skin pops when you crunch into them.

While their sweetness is quite amazing, it isn’t for everyone. And because Cotton Candy grapes look like any other green table grape, your guests might be in for quite a surprise.

  • Growing season: August to September
  • Growing area: California

Conclusion

Whether you’re looking for table grapes or wine grapes, there are many varieties to choose from. Both green and red grapes are a delicious snack that can be transformed into jams, jellies, juice, and wine.

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